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After thinking it over, we decided to stay the night at Junction Meadow for the night. Packer at Junction Meadow So far we have seen: A party we met on the trail today had camped in our spot right here, last night. They warned us that they had seen a rattlesnake in camp. Indeed, on close examination, there are dozens of small holes all around the campsite - under almost every rock and tree in sight. However, we have not seen the snake yet. Junction Meadow All around us the walls tower thousands of feet above us. It is too intimidating to think we will be climbing all that way in the next couple days, so we just admire them.

The walls are extremely steep and end with enormous cliffs at the top. William Brewer explored this canyon in 1984, and was preoccupied with finding his way over the passes to the East. No wonder he was worriedit looks like we are walled in. Interestingly, when Brewer camped here, he saw numerous rattlesnakes. I tried going to bed without a tent. As soon as the sun went down the bugs came out, so I had to put the tent up. Again, we all had a good night's sleep. We got an early start this morning: As before, it soon got hot. The trail gets steeper and steeper as it moves farther up the canyon, which is typical in the Sierra Nevada.

As it gets higher, shade gets less and less frequent. Roy and Eva hike faster than I do, but rest more often, so I just about keep up with them. We were going to stop and rest at Vidette Meadows, but the mosquitoes were so thick we had to practically run past it. The parties that had passed us the day before had evidently stopped there, although I don't see how they could have stood it. Eva beside stepening Bubbs Creek After Vidette Meadow, we left the valley floor and switchbacked up the canyon wall. The Bubbs creek trail continues up toward Forrester Pass to the south, but the segment we followed leads to the John Muir Trail and the Rae Lakes loop, so we were still on one of the main thoroughfares of the park.

Even so, we saw no hikers past Vidette Meadow. We made good time up the trail and arrived at Charlotte Lake by noon. No one was there when we arrived, but a the Charlotte Lake ranger, and a trail crew returned to their campsites nearby later in the day. The ranger had been to Gardiner Pass, but not beyond. By this time we could already see that there was no snow on the pass - something we had been worried about. She was dubious about our plan to go over King Col - she had never heard of anyone doing that. Later she got on the radio and consulted with the Rae Lake ranger who agreed that King Col would be dicy.

She tried to reach the Bench Lake ranger to ask him, but he had not responded to his radio for the past three days. She told us to check in with him when we passed, and to let him know what we found on King Col. The map makes it look almost trivial, but it was steeper than it looks. About half way up, it started to rain. I waited under a tree for a while, yet it just rained harder and harder, so I retreated. It wound up raining for two hours. The rain stopped just at dinner time, so we did not have to cook in the rain. But the mosquitoes came out again at sundown, so we all headed back into the tents. My feet - a traditional worry - are doing great. I have a tiny blister on my heel, which formed a couple of days ago, but it is holding steady.

Roy has an ugly blister on his big toe, probably a result of his new boots. Eva's feet are fine. So far, a trouble-free trip. The main peaks in Gardiner Basin, Mt. Gardiner, Mt. Cotter, and Mt. King, are all named after members of his expedition. Brewer is across Bubbs Creek to the south a few miles. Charlotte Lake from slopes of Mt. From here on there is no regular trail. We were able to follow faint signs of an old trail in most places. If we had tried harder we could probably have found more of it, but the general direction was clear and hiking conditions were good. As the path left the canyon floor, the convenience of a trail was more and more pronounced. Eva and Roy again led most of the way.

The trail drops significantly until it gets to a sort of a junction high up on the valley wall, where it meets another faint trail, apparently one up Charlotte Creek. Then it climbs upward into the bowl below Gardiner Pass. Charlotte Dome center and Gardiner Pass right We stopped for a rest and a drink of water there, and scouted around for signs of the trail. The climb up to Gardiner Pass is very steep, despite the "switchbacks. There are several potential points on the ridgeline that might be the pass, at least from the Charlotte Creek side. The correct one is to the right and slightly higher than the low point.

On the Gardiner Basin side there is only one spot without huge cliffs, so it is essential to cross at the pass. We were all glad to get to the pass - we were drenched in sweat and very thirsty. There was a breeze at the top, and spectacular views in both directions. To the south is Bubbs Creek, and beyond that Mt. Brewer and its environs. West Fork Gardiner Basin from Gardiner Pass The north side of the pass is much steeper than the south, and the nagging concern over how we were going to get down occupied our minds as we rested and snacked up above.

The first 40 feet were straight down. There may have been a way to bypass this section by going up the ridge to the east, but I found a rock-choked crack and descended it like a ladder. I think it gave Roy second thoughts, but we all made it down safely. Descending North side of Gardiner Pass The next thousand feet or so were very steep and rocky, but not vertical. It looked like every approaching cliff would be impassable, but I kept finding signs of a path, so I knew were heading in the right direction. We aimed for the closest lake in the upper valley, and arrived just before noon.

The north side of the pass held the first patches of snow we had come across, but we had no difficulty crossing or bypassing them. Below Gardiner Pass Even though we were among snow patches, just under 11,000 feet, the water in the lake was surprisingly warm only frigid. I swam out to an island in the lake, turned around, and swam right back. The sun was still ferocious, so I was dried off in less than half an hour. I tried to stay covered up so that I would not burn, and succeeded in only burning my feet between the sandal straps. Later both Roy and Eva went swimming, and we all rinsed out our dusty clothing.

We generally lounged around camp, recovering from the steep descent, admiring the spectacular scenery and wonderful views, exploring the surrounding lakes. If I were hiking alone, that is probably what I would do. But Roy and Eva are content to stay put, and after some thought I realized that Gardiner Basin is probably as scenic and remote as Arrow Canyon, and we were already here. So instead of hurrying through Gardiner Basin, we will make Gardiner Basin the focus of the trip. This simultaneously relieved the schedule pressure, the necessity to make it over King Col, and the long hiking days later in the week.

Later in the afternoon it became breezy and then cloudy. We could hear thunder all afternoon, and lots of dark, threatening clouds swirled around us. It never did rain on us though. And there were no mosquitoes all day long. But as before, after dark the mosquitoes came out, so we had to put up the tents and hide inside. I must have had forty on my screen door! North side of Gardiner Pass from campsite July 25West Fork Gardiner Creek In the new spirit of taking it easier, we all slept in until the sun was upon us, ate and packed in a more leisurely way, and got off at 9: Our plan was to descend the west fork of Gardiner Creek, to the big lake just above where it joins the east fork.

We did not see signs of the trail often, so we just wandered down from one lake to the next, crossing and re-crossing the stream and dropping steadily. We had to negotiate downed trees, brushy places, and swampy spots more and more as we descended. We finally had to cross a shallow arm of a lake. I waded across with my boots on, getting them thoroughly soaked, while Roy and Eva changed into their sandals. We were being harassed by mosquitoes when we stopped, so we kept moving pretty steadily. I was growing increasingly concerned that we find the trail, because the guidebook warns of an "incredibly steep" descent beyond the big lake, and I wanted to find the trail for this descent.

So I was greatly relieved to find unmistakable signs of the trail starting its descent. Five minutes later was the lake, and for the first time, no mosquitoes. We found a wonderful campsite, with great views of the lake, rocks piled into tables and chairs, and good clear spots to sleep. I noticed, like at lakes further up the canyon, that the obvious bear-hanging trees had lots of claw marks. I am surprised that there are enough visitors to attract bears. In any case, we hung our food in one of the clawed-up trees and never saw any bears. West Fork Gardiner CreekGardiner Pass on horizon I am finally able to relax, get out of the hurry-up mentality, and stop wondering when we will get there.

We are there. I think Roy and Eva achieved this several days ago, but it always takes me a long time to slow down and adopt the pace of the trail. Roy put up his hammock, and I lounged in it for a couple of hours, just observing the changes in the lake and surroundings as the sun moved across the sky. Each day the clouds seem to form a little earlier and get a little thicker. We began hiking down the canyon wall toward the main fork of Gardiner Creek. It was exceptionally steep, but not rocky or obstructed by cliffs, and we kept sight of a rudimentary trail the whole way down.

At the bottom, we had a much harder time finding the trail. It was marked by little piles of rocks here and there, but these did not seem to follow a better route than any other, and we kept losing track of them. We had been warned that cliffs in the canyon floor would block our way, and that we should look for an opportunity to climb part way up the canyon wall to bypass the cliffs. This part of the canyon, like so many other canyons in the Sierra, has a profile, looking up and down the canyon, like a series of stair steps. On the level places are meadows or lakes, separated by cliffs, waterfalls, and large rocky monoliths.

The canyon in cross section is generally flat on the bottom with nearly vertical sides, above which is a zone of broken rocks at the bottom of vertical cliffs near the ridges. The guidebook advised up to get up to the zone of broken rocks beneath the cliffs and follow this up the canyon. Soon an opportunity to get up presented itself. The trail seemed to be headed in that direction, although it was hard to be sure. So we struggled up the canyon wall and proceeded to pick our way through the rocks upward. It was nerve wracking because it was impossible to see very far ahead, and I always had the fear that our way would be blocked and we would have to retrace our steps.

We kept on going, looking for a way back down to the canyon floor without losing too much of the altitude we had gained. Finally we could stand it no longer, and just decided to get directly down. There was a crack handy, which we descended. We were much relieved to be back on the more gentle lower slopes. Descending canyon wall in Gardiner Basin As we were reaching a good resting spot for lunch it began to rain, so we hung up the food, broke out the tents, and got inside. The wind blew so hard I thought we might blow away. I put everything I had inside the tent, and had to go out over and over to tighten the lines, since they tend to stretch as they get wet.

The storm ended a couple hours later without really dropping much rain. Waiting out rain in Gardiner Basin Since we are already set up, we decided to stay for the night. We are in a stand of trees between two small lakes. I did some exploration, and found some rock piles leading up the canyon. As I followed them, I realized that we were not on the recommended route at all, but in a side canyon. But the path leads over a nearby ridge into the "correct" canyon. Since the map indicates more cliffs along the canyon floor, I hope that we can do a better job of staying on the route tomorrow. Lakelet near campsite July 27Gardiner Basin beneath Mt. Cotter The weather at night has been unusually warm the whole trip, and last night was no exception.

Maybe it is the result of the overcast skies. About 4: By the time I was finished the rain had stopped. Since Roy and Eva were already in their tent, I suspect they never even woke up. The clouds this morning are thicker than ever, and it is cooler. We have not had to deal with real hot weather since the day we crossed into Gardiner Basin. We resumed our climb up the east fork of Gardiner Creek, following markers where we can find them. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.

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I had been sure the rain would stop at nightfall. As I lay there after midnight, my mind went over the alternatives. We had planned to climb Mt. Cotter the next day, but that would be impossible on wet, slippery rock. If it kept raining, we could not even get out of Gardiner Basin, which involved climbing up over steep, rocky, trailless slopes. Could we stand to wait in our tents for the rain to end? The weather had been getting cloudier, the rain had lasted longer, every day for the past week. How much longer could it go on? If we were forced to wait an extra day, how could we make it up? On and on my mind spun. I opened my eyes, and the tent seemed to be glowing.

My watch read 1: I listened to the tent fly flapping in the wind, but I no longer heard the sound of rain. I opened the tent door and saw the full moon poking through a hole in the clouds, illuminating the cliffs around us as well as the clouds above. The thick overcast sky of the previous days had turned patchy - I could even see stars through other holes in the clouds. I closed my eyes for a moment and it was 2: The moon had set behind some neighboring cliffs, but was illuminating Mt. Cotter, which seemed to be glowing a ghostly white. The mountain looked more like it I had been covered in a dusting of snow. Maybe the weather pattern had changed for good.

I settled down to sleep and the next thing I knew the sun was rising over a brilliant blue, cloudless sky. But let me start from the beginning... You can jump directly to points in the trip by clicking on the map above. You can download the TOPO! You can see the raw photos here. How to order norvasc online - Norvasc 5mg online kaufen We left home yesterday at 5: The flight went smoothly, arriving in San Francisco ahead of schedule. We even caught an earlier flight Fresno. Unfortunately our baggage did not make it out with us, so we had to wait for it at Fresno. In the meantime, we got our car, bought fuel, and were all set to go the minute our baggage arrived.

Foiled again! One of our bags fell of the baggage cart on the runway and it took us half an hour to spot it and call it to the attention of the baggage handlers. So we were the last ones out of the airport. My major concern, the stoves and fuel bottles, made it through. The agent in Newark inspected them but let them go on. Since we planned to hike in the first day, we made arrangements to pick up our wilderness permit at Grant Grove in Sequoia, rather than at the trailhead. This gave us a chance to interact with the "road" rangers rather than the "backcountry" rangers.

While I was picking up my permit, the visitor next to me was asking the ranger "Where is Old Faithful? Well, how do I get there? Do you want me to get out a US map? The visitor appeared headed right for Wyoming. Meanwhile, the ranger handling my backcountry permit had no idea where we planned to go, and did not even fill out his own copy of the permit with our itinerary. He gave us some misinformation about the snowline, and we were off. At Cedar Grove we stopped at the snack bar to get got drinks and ice cream. It was 107 degrees in Fresno, and only about 15 degrees cooler in Cedar Grove. We repacked all our luggage and drove on to the trailhead, ready to go by 5: Repacking at Cedar Grove The first part of the trail was on the broad, flat, valley floor.

The trail was sandy and wide, with walls towering over us on both sides, thousands of feet high. After two miles we crossed Bubbs Creek, and then headed up two miles of switchbacks. The weather was hot and dry, with little shade. We had plenty of time to make dinner and set up the tents before it started to get dark. There were a few mosquitoes when I went to bed, so I put up the tent. I woke up an hour later and found the mosquitoes had disappeared, so I left the door open the rest of the night. I was pleasantly surprised at how well I slept - usually the combination of exhaustion, altitude, jet lag, sleeping on the ground, excitement, and worry wake me up every half hour the first two nights, at least.

Bubbs Creek trail below high valley walls This next morning was bright and clear. We all stayed in bed for an hour after sunrise, dozing. This is indication that everyone was comfortable the first night. Despite dallying, we were ready to leave by 8: The plan was to hike seven miles, ascending 2000 feet along Bubbs Creek. Before long the weather turned hot, but Roy and Eva kept up a fast pace. I trailed most of the way. We reached Junction Meadow, our planned destination by 12: We saw several small parties headed the other way, but no one going our direction. We set up camp at Junction Meadow, ate lunch, and took a snooze. While we were napping, a packer arrived and dumped a big pile of equipment in the campsite next to ours.

Some time later, a group of people showed up to claim it, carrying only day packs. We saw a couple other parties, probably including those camped at Sphynx Creek Junction last night. They all went on past us, toward Vidette Meadow. After thinking it over, we decided to stay the night at Junction Meadow for the night. Packer at Junction Meadow So far we have seen: A party we met on the trail today had camped in our spot right here, last night. They warned us that they had seen a rattlesnake in camp. Indeed, on close examination, there are dozens of small holes all around the campsite - under almost every rock and tree in sight.

However, we have not seen the snake yet. Junction Meadow All around us the walls tower thousands of feet above us. It is too intimidating to think we will be climbing all that way in the next couple days, so we just admire them. The walls are extremely steep and end with enormous cliffs at the top. William Brewer explored this canyon in 1984, and was preoccupied with finding his way over the passes to the East. No wonder he was worriedit looks like we are walled in. Interestingly, when Brewer camped here, he saw numerous rattlesnakes. I tried going to bed without a tent. As soon as the sun went down the bugs came out, so I had to put the tent up.

Again, we all had a good night's sleep. We got an early start this morning: As before, it soon got hot. The trail gets steeper and steeper as it moves farther up the canyon, which is typical in the Sierra Nevada. As it gets higher, shade gets less and less frequent. Roy and Eva hike faster than I do, but rest more often, so I just about keep up with them. We were going to stop and rest at Vidette Meadows, but the mosquitoes were so thick we had to practically run past it. The parties that had passed us the day before had evidently stopped there, although I don't see how they could have stood it. Eva beside stepening Bubbs Creek After Vidette Meadow, we left the valley floor and switchbacked up the canyon wall.

The Bubbs creek trail continues up toward Forrester Pass to the south, but the segment we followed leads to the John Muir Trail and the Rae Lakes loop, so we were still on one of the main thoroughfares of the park. Even so, we saw no hikers past Vidette Meadow. We made good time up the trail and arrived at Charlotte Lake by noon. No one was there when we arrived, but a the Charlotte Lake ranger, and a trail crew returned to their campsites nearby later in the day. The ranger had been to Gardiner Pass, but not beyond. By this time we could already see that there was no snow on the pass - something we had been worried about.

She was dubious about our plan to go over King Col - she had never heard of anyone doing that. Later she got on the radio and consulted with the Rae Lake ranger who agreed that King Col would be dicy. She tried to reach the Bench Lake ranger to ask him, but he had not responded to his radio for the past three days. She told us to check in with him when we passed, and to let him know what we found on King Col. The map makes it look almost trivial, but it was steeper than it looks. About half way up, it started to rain. I waited under a tree for a while, yet it just rained harder and harder, so I retreated.

It wound up raining for two hours. The rain stopped just at dinner time, so we did not have to cook in the rain. But the mosquitoes came out again at sundown, so we all headed back into the tents. My feet - a traditional worry - are doing great. I have a tiny blister on my heel, which formed a couple of days ago, but it is holding steady. Roy has an ugly blister on his big toe, probably a result of his new boots. Eva's feet are fine. So far, a trouble-free trip. The main peaks in Gardiner Basin, Mt. Gardiner, Mt. Cotter, and Mt. King, are all named after members of his expedition. Brewer is across Bubbs Creek to the south a few miles.

Charlotte Lake from slopes of Mt. From here on there is no regular trail. We were able to follow faint signs of an old trail in most places. If we had tried harder we could probably have found more of it, but the general direction was clear and hiking conditions were good. As the path left the canyon floor, the convenience of a trail was more and more pronounced. Eva and Roy again led most of the way. The trail drops significantly until it gets to a sort of a junction high up on the valley wall, where it meets another faint trail, apparently one up Charlotte Creek. Then it climbs upward into the bowl below Gardiner Pass. Charlotte Dome center and Gardiner Pass right We stopped for a rest and a drink of water there, and scouted around for signs of the trail.

The climb up to Gardiner Pass is very steep, despite the "switchbacks. There are several potential points on the ridgeline that might be the pass, at least from the Charlotte Creek side. The correct one is to the right and slightly higher than the low point. On the Gardiner Basin side there is only one spot without huge cliffs, so it is essential to cross at the pass. We were all glad to get to the pass - we were drenched in sweat and very thirsty. There was a breeze at the top, and spectacular views in both directions. To the south is Bubbs Creek, and beyond that Mt. Brewer and its environs. West Fork Gardiner Basin from Gardiner Pass The north side of the pass is much steeper than the south, and the nagging concern over how we were going to get down occupied our minds as we rested and snacked up above.

The first 40 feet were straight down. There may have been a way to bypass this section by going up the ridge to the east, but I found a rock-choked crack and descended it like a ladder. I think it gave Roy second thoughts, but we all made it down safely. Descending North side of Gardiner Pass The next thousand feet or so were very steep and rocky, but not vertical. It looked like every approaching cliff would be impassable, but I kept finding signs of a path, so I knew were heading in the right direction. We aimed for the closest lake in the upper valley, and arrived just before noon. The north side of the pass held the first patches of snow we had come across, but we had no difficulty crossing or bypassing them.

Below Gardiner Pass Even though we were among snow patches, just under 11,000 feet, the water in the lake was surprisingly warm only frigid. I swam out to an island in the lake, turned around, and swam right back. The sun was still ferocious, so I was dried off in less than half an hour. Drinking alcohol can lower your blood pressure, which may increase certain side effects of Norvasc. You should not drink alcohol while taking Norvasc. When you first start taking Norvasc your chest pain may increase or get worse. Tell your doctor right away if your chest pain is severe or ongoing.

Norvasc is a part of a complete program that your doctor has prescribed for you. This program includes diet, exercise, weight control, and possibly other medications. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines closely. You should not take Norvasc if you are allergic to amlodipine. Tell your doctor if you are taking any other heart or blood pressure medications. Before taking Norvasc, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure, a heart valve problem called aortic stenosis or liver disease. Norvasc is in FDA pregnancy category C. We do not know if Norvasc can harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you plan to become pregnant before taking Norvasc.

It is also not known whether Norvasc passes into breast milk and could cause harm to a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking Norvasc. If you are currently taking a beta-blocker drug, like Betapace, Blocadren, Corgard, Coreg, Inderal, InnoPran, Lopressor, Normodyne, Tenoretic, Tenormin , Toprol, Trandate or Zebeta do not suddenly stop using the beta-blocker without first talking to your doctor. Your doctor may have you taper down the dosage of your beta-blocker before stopping completely. If you stop using a beta-blocker suddenly you may be at risk for possible serious heart problems, which Norvasc cannot prevent.

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